A Conversation with Tigran Mansurian

A Conversation with Tigran Mansurian

A feature by Nairi Galstanian

In 1969, the Armenian film director Sergei Parajanov released his masterpiece Sayat-Nova. A world-cultural event, the film prompted Andrei Tarkovsky to deem Parajanov “a genius” and Michelangelo Antonioni to proclaim the film “of a stunningly perfect beauty… Parajanov, in my opinion, is one of best film directors in the world.” For Tigran Mansurian, the Armenian composer who, with its score, invented a new musical language, Sayat-Nova was “an extraordinary phenomenon of universal importance.” Based on the life of the eighteenth-century poet and musician Sayat-Nova (King of Song), the film was released in English under the title The Color of Pomegranates. In the following interview, which took place during the summer of 2006, Mansurian offers a unique point of inquiry to Parajanov’s creative world as well as his magnum opus. Music & Literature is grateful to Tigran Mansurian for the opportunity to present this conversation for the first time in English.

Conversations with László Krasznahorkai

Conversations with László Krasznahorkai

A feature by Mauro Javier Cardenas

On June 26th, 2012, I found myself touring San Francisco with László Krasznahorkai, who was on his first U.S. tour, promoting the release of Sátántangó. During lunch with László and his wife in Chinatown, I received an email asking if I would moderate a discussion with László at City Lights Books the next day. Presented here for the first time is our conversation from before and after László Krasznahorkai’s appearance at City Lights on June 27th, where the overflowing crowd stood enraptured by his impassioned answers. All the while, László spoke in long, warm monologues, which brought to mind the intense monologues of György Korin, the hero of his novel War & War.

An Interview with Steven Moore

An Interview with Steven Moore

A feature by Jeff Bursey

Scholar, editor, and literary historian Steven Moore has gained notoriety as the preeminent explicator of William Gaddis’s fiction. A tireless champion of maximalist and so-called “experimental” fiction, Moore has helped to publish and edit works by David Markson, Joseph McElroy, Rikki Ducornet, Alexander Theroux, and David Foster Wallace, among many others. In 2004, Moore embarked on the ambitious, multi-volume The Novel: An Alternative History, the second volume of which was released this past summer. The project, nearly a decade in the making, is as much an effort to reconceptualize the contemporary definition of the novel form as it is an attempt to revolutionize the manner in which we discuss fiction. On a hiatus from writing, Moore reflects on his own early development and the project that has changed his life with fiction writer and literary critic Jeff Bursey.

The Three Archives of Gerald Murnane

The Three Archives of Gerald Murnane

Music & Literature is proud to debut the complete and comprehensive catalog of Gerald Murnane's remarkable personal archives. Murnane is the reclusive Australian author of eleven works of fiction, and has for decades accumulated an impressive collection of literary, personal, and creative manuscripts, including his legendary Antipodean Archive. Murnane has stated that these archives will not be made public until after his death, but here we are given a glimpse into his many worlds. Revered in his home country and deemed "a genius on the level of Beckett" by Teju Cole, Murnane is regularly rumored as a candidate for the Nobel Prize.